Fannie Fierce

Black Feminist Queer Politics AND STRUGGLE

22,489 notes

timsaturday:

youarenotdesi:

M.I.A. shitting on ignorant opinions

This isn’t a Nazi Swastika what so ever, as a JEW I can recognize this unlike some people.
Gonna quote straight from wikipedia here.

It is a symbol among the ancient Celts, Indians, and Greeks,[2]as well as in later Buddhism,[4]Jainism,[5]Hinduism,[6][4]and Nazism,[3][4]among other cultures and religions.[4][2]
The word swastika derives from the Sanskrit root ssu(“Good”),asti(“to be”),[4][6]andka(making)[6]The older term gammadion cross derives from its appearance, which is identical to four Greek gamma letters affixed to each other.

What I find interesting is that this is actually a very very good representation of what can happen when white people culturally appropriate something.The Swastika, long before the Nazis came about and started brandishing their own bastardization of it, had a strong religious and cultural significance to a LOT of people.
It didn’t represent anything evil, it didn’t represent a dictatorship that perpetuated one of the most well known genocides taught today.
It only started having this horrible association in the 1920’s when the Nazi party appropriated it as for their logo.
White people, white supremacists, taking something with an already well established past and meaning; and placing their own over it.
Because of these people, swastikas that do not have anything to do with the Nazi party are demonized in most people’s eyes because they don’t know any better, because white people wiped out it’s original meaning in white culture.
People seriously need to learn some history.THIS is the sort of damage that cultural appropriation can do in the long run.

timsaturday:

youarenotdesi:

M.I.A. shitting on ignorant opinions

This isn’t a Nazi Swastika what so ever, as a JEW I can recognize this unlike some people.

Gonna quote straight from wikipedia here.

It is a symbol among the ancient Celts, Indians, and Greeks,[2]as well as in later Buddhism,[4]Jainism,[5]Hinduism,[6][4]and Nazism,[3][4]among other cultures and religions.[4][2]

The word swastika derives from the Sanskrit root ssu(“Good”),asti(“to be”),[4][6]andka(making)[6]The older term gammadion cross derives from its appearance, which is identical to four Greek gamma letters affixed to each other.

What I find interesting is that this is actually a very very good representation of what can happen when white people culturally appropriate something.

The Swastika, long before the Nazis came about and started brandishing their own bastardization of it, had a strong religious and cultural significance to a LOT of people.

It didn’t represent anything evil, it didn’t represent a dictatorship that perpetuated one of the most well known genocides taught today.

It only started having this horrible association in the 1920’s when the Nazi party appropriated it as for their logo.

White people, white supremacists, taking something with an already well established past and meaning; and placing their own over it.

Because of these people, swastikas that do not have anything to do with the Nazi party are demonized in most people’s eyes because they don’t know any better, because white people wiped out it’s original meaning in white culture.

People seriously need to learn some history.
THIS is the sort of damage that cultural appropriation can do in the long run.

(via fuckyeahexistentialism)

2,065 notes

There are some people who always seem angry and continually seek out conflict. Walk away; the battle they are fighting is not really with you - it’s with themselves.
Lessons Learned in Life (via onlinecounsellingcollege)

21,607 notes

91,791 Plays
Billie Holiday
Strange Fruit

75 years ago, on this date, Billie Holiday recorded a song that Time Magazine would call song of the century: Strange Fruit, a song written about a lynching in the South. 

Holiday first performed the song at Cafe Society in 1939. She said that singing it made her fearful of retaliation but, because its imagery reminded her of her father, she continued to sing the piece making it a regular part of her live performances. Because of the poignancy of the song, Josephson drew up some rules: Holiday would close with it; the waiters would stop all service in advance; the room would be in darkness except for a spotlight on Holiday’s face; and there would be no encore. During the musical introduction, Holiday would stand with her eyes closed, as if she were evoking a prayer.

(Source: salsmineo, via quirkyblackgirls)

22,571 notes

Race is constant. You’re tired of hearing about it? Imagine how fucking exhausting it is living it.
Jon Stewart addressing Fox News’s (white) correspondents whining about hearing about race issues in the United States (via framesjanco)

(Source: wryan, via marronsolbesochica)